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A Master of Djinn

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Nebula, Locus, and Alex Award-winner P. Djèlí Clark returns to his popular alternate Cairo universe for his fantasy novel debut, A Master of Djinn Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha’arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she’s certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe l Nebula, Locus, and Alex Award-winner P. Djèlí Clark returns to his popular alternate Cairo universe for his fantasy novel debut, A Master of Djinn Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha’arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she’s certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe last summer. So when someone murders a secret brotherhood dedicated to one of the most famous men in history, al-Jahiz, Agent Fatma is called onto the case. Al-Jahiz transformed the world 50 years ago when he opened up the veil between the magical and mundane realms, before vanishing into the unknown. This murderer claims to be al-Jahiz, returned to condemn the modern age for its social oppressions. His dangerous magical abilities instigate unrest in the streets of Cairo that threaten to spill over onto the global stage. Alongside her Ministry colleagues and her clever girlfriend Siti, Agent Fatma must unravel the mystery behind this imposter to restore peace to the city - or face the possibility he could be exactly who he seems....


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Nebula, Locus, and Alex Award-winner P. Djèlí Clark returns to his popular alternate Cairo universe for his fantasy novel debut, A Master of Djinn Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha’arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she’s certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe l Nebula, Locus, and Alex Award-winner P. Djèlí Clark returns to his popular alternate Cairo universe for his fantasy novel debut, A Master of Djinn Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha’arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she’s certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe last summer. So when someone murders a secret brotherhood dedicated to one of the most famous men in history, al-Jahiz, Agent Fatma is called onto the case. Al-Jahiz transformed the world 50 years ago when he opened up the veil between the magical and mundane realms, before vanishing into the unknown. This murderer claims to be al-Jahiz, returned to condemn the modern age for its social oppressions. His dangerous magical abilities instigate unrest in the streets of Cairo that threaten to spill over onto the global stage. Alongside her Ministry colleagues and her clever girlfriend Siti, Agent Fatma must unravel the mystery behind this imposter to restore peace to the city - or face the possibility he could be exactly who he seems....

30 review for A Master of Djinn

  1. 5 out of 5

    chai ♡

    This book is so blisteringly good. P. Djèlí Clark reimagines history with vivacity, ingenuity, and pure damn style in his alternate early 20th c. Egypt that has forcibly sloughed off the British colonial yoke and risen to power with the help of Djinn. It has murder, magic, mayhem, and at the center of it all, one lesbian detective with a sharp taste in suits and even sharper monster-hunting chops. I had so much fun reading this!

  2. 4 out of 5

    carol.

    P. Djèlí Clark is one of those authors that’s on my ‘to watch’ list. You might even say I’m a fan. I’ve read through most of his short stories and purchased most of his novellas, something I don’t do for just anyone these days. I was anticipating A Master of Djinn and when it appeared on Netgalley, I jumped at the chance to request it. Imagine my delight when I was approved; it was like Christmas in January. So now I find myself in a quandary because of that most troublesome phenomenon, hope-exp P. Djèlí Clark is one of those authors that’s on my ‘to watch’ list. You might even say I’m a fan. I’ve read through most of his short stories and purchased most of his novellas, something I don’t do for just anyone these days. I was anticipating A Master of Djinn and when it appeared on Netgalley, I jumped at the chance to request it. Imagine my delight when I was approved; it was like Christmas in January. So now I find myself in a quandary because of that most troublesome phenomenon, hope-experience mismatch. Set in the same world as The Haunting of Tram Car 015, it follows Agent Fatma as she’s on a big case–that of the British aristocrat and a number of his guests being viciously murdered. In the eternal style of the buddy-flick, she’s also assigned a new partner, the enthusiastic rookie Hadia. Hadia was one of the joys of this story, and if she’s a bit of a Mary-Sue, it’s a relief, because the story is badly in need of competent protagonists. Inventive worlds are one of Clark’s hallmarks, and it’s fun to see alternate-Egypt fleshed out. The investigation goes from the Ministry building to Fatma’s apartment building, to an underground nightclub, to various unique locations in the city, and I enjoyed getting more feel for the locations, and some of the characters in each. Plot, however, was problematic. While it initially seems to be a murder investigation, it turns out that a much larger game is afoot, one that ultimately (thematic spoiler)(view spoiler)[ reminded me of a Scooby-Doo episode (hide spoiler)] . At times, however, the story felt scattershot, too many asides that pulled focus away from plot. Halfway through, world politics were awkwardly inserted–perhaps as a way to up the tension–and it turns out now there's also goblins to contend with. Unfortunately, I ended up with more questions, having accepted the premise of the adjacent-world for the djinn. The short explanation didn’t square for me, but perhaps someone else will read it differently. “Folktales were collected and scoured for any practical use. Djinn were not native to the country, but there were other creatures–chief among them goblins… allowing [redacted] to rapidly grow in its magical and industrial expertise.” You see, to me this introduced the idea that magic was more common and integrated into societies than just the djinn. So why isn’t Fatma better at noticing it? Investigating it? There’s a character who is an acolyte to one of the old Egyptian gods, and every time Fatma runs into him, she’s struck by that person's odd appearance, as if they are changing into that god. Yet what does she think when she sees them near final transformation? “A man who thought he was an ancient god and was now disfiguring himself.” Really? I don’t understand–we have a world with djinn and goblins and our main character works for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, and she thinks someone is disfiguring themselves over an actual magical transformation? In a world where there are legitimate pocket universes run by djinn? Later, someone confesses a secret that she should have noticed, and she thinks, “what kind of investigator was this unaware of what was going on right in front of her eyes.” I absolutely agreed; she’s actually quite unobservant on multiple occasions, which ends up causing strife in different ways. I realized reading this story that I was coming to the conclusion that Fatma is not competent. The question is, does Clark realize it? Is she a character who we should laugh at for obsessing with clothes over job? My intuition is that is not his intention, and it’s substitution for plot development (spoiler: she literally has people she interviews telling her where to go next). Also awkward was the frequent use of non-English words. I’m no stranger to sci-fi and am more than used to figuring context of a word, but at times it was excessive, to the point of inhibiting story meaning and flow. One particularly cumbersome example: “They wore full-length black kaftans with red tarbooshes. Seated on the modish moss-green divan, were three women, each dressed in a black sebleh and wrapped in a milaya lef. Their faces were hidden behind matching bur’a, though their heads were strangely uncovered. ‘Agent Fatma,’ one called in a familiar voice.” To make it worse, my kindle wasn’t having it, but probably that's because of the ARC. /Eyeroll I can’t help but contrast this with the focus and meaning in Clark’s novella and short stories, and I’m left thinking that Clark is just better in shorter form. This has too many side bits that don’t feel integrated. It’s definitely not a murder-mystery as much as a thriller fantasy. Add a lead character that I found myself withdrawing from and it ended up being something less enjoyable than expected. To remind myself of how good Clark is, I went back and found one of his shorts I had missed, the tight little horrific tale, ‘Night Doctors.’ Damnit! That’s what makes this so hard. Ultimately, it’s better than most of what you will find out there. But it doesn’t live up to his body of work. Many, many thanks to Netgalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for the advanced review copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    S.A. Chakraborty

    Loved it! Wicked and sharp and wry, it's a fun mystery set in an alternative steampunk Cairo I could read an entire series about. Fatma and Hadia are my new favorite "grumpy mentor/wide-eyed rookie" pair Loved it! Wicked and sharp and wry, it's a fun mystery set in an alternative steampunk Cairo I could read an entire series about. Fatma and Hadia are my new favorite "grumpy mentor/wide-eyed rookie" pair

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Roanhorse

    A delightful whodunnit full of sly commentary and a wonderfully lived-in steampunk Cairo. The story has the familiar trappings -- a mysterious supernatural murder, a detective to solve it, a rookie partner, clues and hindrances and a slowly unspooling plot -- which allows all the lovely details in this story to shine. I loved the world and the characters that inhabited it, both human and otherwise. Strong female cast, a nice (and important to the plot) queer romance, a gang of thieves, worshippe A delightful whodunnit full of sly commentary and a wonderfully lived-in steampunk Cairo. The story has the familiar trappings -- a mysterious supernatural murder, a detective to solve it, a rookie partner, clues and hindrances and a slowly unspooling plot -- which allows all the lovely details in this story to shine. I loved the world and the characters that inhabited it, both human and otherwise. Strong female cast, a nice (and important to the plot) queer romance, a gang of thieves, worshippers of the old Egyptian gods, djinn, clockwork angels, ancient manuscripts. The perfect read when I needed a break from this world to enjoy one wholly made from Clark's enviable imagination.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Returning to the world of pre-WWI Cairo, Egypt, where Djinn coexist with humans, where there are old Egyptian gods (or at least their followers with a touch of the divine within them), and a host of wonderful crossovers right out of the pages of 1001 Arabian Knights, Steampunk novels, and good, old-fashioned modern UF, I have to say I'm loving every moment. It took me a moment to get into the series, but it didn't take that long. The fact is, I like Fatma. She's got that Bowler hat and her invest Returning to the world of pre-WWI Cairo, Egypt, where Djinn coexist with humans, where there are old Egyptian gods (or at least their followers with a touch of the divine within them), and a host of wonderful crossovers right out of the pages of 1001 Arabian Knights, Steampunk novels, and good, old-fashioned modern UF, I have to say I'm loving every moment. It took me a moment to get into the series, but it didn't take that long. The fact is, I like Fatma. She's got that Bowler hat and her investigation skills sharpened and the worldbuilding makes every second here worthwhile. Better, it builds upon itself, staying nicely grounded while evoking a sense of things going completely out of control. Classic conflicts, but with a spin on it that I personally loved. (No spoilers.) Suffice to say, I'm now officially hooked. I was into it before, but this full-sized novel made it perfect for me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Enjoyable author interview at BookPage! There are really terrific lines. There are Zack-Snyder-meets-Michael-Bay battle scenes. There is a majgicqk system that is more fun than three dozen djinn in a jar. The Ifrit Kings! What a gorgeous scene that will be in the film! As I suspect y'all who haven't yet read the book are beginning to gather, this was a hit with me. The best thing about blogging is I now don't have to worry about spoilers anymore, if you're still here and not heeding my recommendati Enjoyable author interview at BookPage! There are really terrific lines. There are Zack-Snyder-meets-Michael-Bay battle scenes. There is a majgicqk system that is more fun than three dozen djinn in a jar. The Ifrit Kings! What a gorgeous scene that will be in the film! As I suspect y'all who haven't yet read the book are beginning to gather, this was a hit with me. The best thing about blogging is I now don't have to worry about spoilers anymore, if you're still here and not heeding my recommendation to seek out the rest of the world-building bits of the story in order, it's not my problem! A magazine site would insist that I consider the spoilerphobic soul's delicate eyestalks. I won't spoil what I consider the bits that make the trip worth taking. And that is a lot. There are so many things I absolutely felt as though I'd *combust* if I didn't have someone to talk about them to! But it really isn't fair to say what happened on the palace roof until you've been there. So here's the stuff I want to let everyone know: at Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    Man do I love this world!! P Djeli Clark is such a master of evoking a world and a *vibe* that creates such a vivid picture in my head. While I do think that this does have some bumps in the road in terms of him transitioning from shorter fiction to his first full length novel re: pacing (this one does feel a bit over full and like a bunch of novellas pieced together), I still loved the time I spent with Fatma as she takes on the challenge of a new partner at work and tries to figure out what in Man do I love this world!! P Djeli Clark is such a master of evoking a world and a *vibe* that creates such a vivid picture in my head. While I do think that this does have some bumps in the road in terms of him transitioning from shorter fiction to his first full length novel re: pacing (this one does feel a bit over full and like a bunch of novellas pieced together), I still loved the time I spent with Fatma as she takes on the challenge of a new partner at work and tries to figure out what in the world she's going to do with Siti. The mystery plot was fun (not too surprising but I had a good time) and the character work was A+. All around, can't wait to keep reading in this series!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Juliana (Midnight Book Blog)

    Once again, P. Djèlí Clark weaves an absolutely stunning fantasy world. Plot: Seriously, this world is so enchanting. It’s one of those books where the setting kind of becomes the plot because every moment you are unsure what magic is going to pop up next. The blend of genres is seamless and was able to captivate even my short, impatient attention span. Characters: I will say that I had a slight problem with the repetitiveness of certain characters. I saw it mentioned in another review that Fatm Once again, P. Djèlí Clark weaves an absolutely stunning fantasy world. Plot: Seriously, this world is so enchanting. It’s one of those books where the setting kind of becomes the plot because every moment you are unsure what magic is going to pop up next. The blend of genres is seamless and was able to captivate even my short, impatient attention span. Characters: I will say that I had a slight problem with the repetitiveness of certain characters. I saw it mentioned in another review that Fatma was pretty much boiled down to her love of suits, which I think is accurate. I wish that there had been less emphasis on one single definition trait for the MCs. However, I still liked them. Overall: I have enjoyed the entirety of the Dead Djinn universe, and don’t want to come off too critical. The world building alone will make me read any future books in this series. I would definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to get lost in a gorgeously told and vivid story! Content warnings: murder, violence Click here for the full review on my blog!

  9. 4 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    I was really looking forward to this as the world is genius and I adored the short stories, but the full novel didn't quite click for me. Perhaps because it's a mix of mystery and fantasy thriller, and we had a lot of setting up of the mystery element, with clues and red herrings, which I thought slowed the first half down. It worked a lot better for me once the adventure/fantasy element hit its stride and Fatma was able to act rather than react. I was really looking forward to this as the world is genius and I adored the short stories, but the full novel didn't quite click for me. Perhaps because it's a mix of mystery and fantasy thriller, and we had a lot of setting up of the mystery element, with clues and red herrings, which I thought slowed the first half down. It worked a lot better for me once the adventure/fantasy element hit its stride and Fatma was able to act rather than react.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lady H

    well, gang, i've found my favorite book of the year well, gang, i've found my favorite book of the year

  11. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    This is Egypt of 1912, but not quite the Egypt that you have learned about in history books. Yes, there is a European presence but not the domination of locals that both Britain and France exerted during this period. Why? Because in Clark’s world a master of the supernatural, al-Jahiz, has broken through the barrier that has kept creatures like the Djinn apart from humans (for the most part) and they are now in Cairo side by side with “us.” Our perspective is mostly through a woman who is part of This is Egypt of 1912, but not quite the Egypt that you have learned about in history books. Yes, there is a European presence but not the domination of locals that both Britain and France exerted during this period. Why? Because in Clark’s world a master of the supernatural, al-Jahiz, has broken through the barrier that has kept creatures like the Djinn apart from humans (for the most part) and they are now in Cairo side by side with “us.” Our perspective is mostly through a woman who is part of the “liberated” vanguard, Fatma el-Sha’arawi. She has already distinguished herself at the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments, and Supernatural Entities. Those who have been reading Clark have met her before. But with all of her talent and intelligence she may be out of her depth with the challenge that she and her colleagues face. Those who already are familiar with the author are prepared for a deep dive into history and culture. This book does not disappoint as we are shown elements from before the Fatimids to the “current” Ottoman dynasty. There is no “spoon feeding” so you may want to have an encyclopedia or dictionary to help you know what to expect when someone points a kabed at another. Here is a typical paragraph: “His Sa’idi accent didn’t hold a hint of Cairene. With that long gallabiyah and sandals he could have stepped right out of her village. ‘Wallahi,…you don’t even come home to sleep in the afternoon like a civilized person…that’s no good for the circulation.’” And there are all sorts of clothing from those gallabiyahs to kaftans, to hijabs of all colors and designs that, perhaps, were significant. A tarboosh or an animal skin might denote rank. Then there are the djinn and “angels” and alchemy and enchantments to be woven into the plot. But why was Lord Worthington, an important foreign Basha, killed. Did it have anything to do with a pending alliance between the Kaiser and the Ottoman Emperor? Who are the Brotherhood of al-Jahiz? And, what path with Fatma choose as she explores Cairo and its environs searching for the truth? Fans of Clark will be happy to note that this book provides a little conjunction of his New Orleans and Nile venues, thus: “The sudden roll of a snare sizzled the air, joined by the faster pace of palms hitting darbukas. It hadn’t taken long for that New Orleans music to blend with local styles – as if the two were reunited kin.” I would not recommend that, if you haven’t read any of Clark, you begin with this book. It might be too overwhelming. Better to start with A Dead Djinn in Cairo https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... or The Haunting of Tram Car 015 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... or even The Black God’s Drums (though that isn’t about Egypt) https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... For those that are prepared for A Master of Djinn, this book is a particular challenge and treat as Clark takes us back and forth: between the Egypt of history and the Egypt of imagination; between the humorous and the poignant. “I am sorry all of this has happened to you, agent.” He offered his cigarette. Fatma hesitated, then accepted, taking a long pull. The tobacco smoke swirled in her nostrils, reaching her tongue – and she gagged. She could probably count the times she’d ever smoked a cigarette on one hand. But this was by far the worst. “This is awful. It tastes like….” “Stale feet?” he suggested. “Why do you smoke them if they’re so bad?” “They don’t call it a habit for nothing.” … “You really believe there’s a” – she fumbled at the word – “god, living inside you?” “A bit of a god. A drop to an ocean…” “What’s happening to you now, is it your choice? Or something being done to you, by your” – she fumbled again – “god?” ….”When you have faith, it really doesn’t matter.” Can Fatma save Cairo (and, perhaps the world) by quickly ascertaining who among the human and supernatural beings hold the facts and clues essential to knowing what is going on and the being(s) behind it all? Highly entertaining. 4.5*

  12. 4 out of 5

    Silvana

    I enjoyed the previous novellas set in this alt world - djinns and humans living side by side and colonization in Africa was thwarted because of the djinns - so I was really looking forward to the full length novel. Imagine my shock when Tor approved my ARC request - which is very rare since I don't have any blog or youtube or anything beside GR. Anyway, Fatma is a fun lead character, she's competent (but not perfect) and her style is impeccable. Yeah, I think it's a nice touch, her fashion sens I enjoyed the previous novellas set in this alt world - djinns and humans living side by side and colonization in Africa was thwarted because of the djinns - so I was really looking forward to the full length novel. Imagine my shock when Tor approved my ARC request - which is very rare since I don't have any blog or youtube or anything beside GR. Anyway, Fatma is a fun lead character, she's competent (but not perfect) and her style is impeccable. Yeah, I think it's a nice touch, her fashion sense. And so much girl power here, especially since she got herself a partner, Hadia, who's also a competent agent, very handy with the sword and her wide network. I love reading about female partnership (in work place especially) since it is rare in the usual SFF works I read. Do let me know if you find another good one. The book's a rollercoaster ride, but it is also packed with lots of background, not just culture - I assume most of them like food are real - but also some history. I haven't brushed up my 1912 world history knowledge but what do I know that in the real world, it was a troubled time and a prelude of the First World War. So, like the suffrage movement in the one of the previous novellas, there were some politics in play here, intertwined with the action-packed scenes of insane djinn (and whatnots) magic. I think it'll make a good TV show or movie, who knows.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gerhard

    If you steal, steal a camel, she heard her mother whisper. And if you love, love the moon. ‘Go big or go broke’ seems to be P. Djèlí Clark’s motto in his first novel-length foray into the world of ‘A Dead Djinn in Cairo’ and the Nebula-winning ‘The Haunting of Tram Car 015’. All feature Fatma el-Sha’arawi, an investigator at the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities in a steampunk version of Cairo. And no, you don’t have to have read the preceding novellas. Although previous If you steal, steal a camel, she heard her mother whisper. And if you love, love the moon. ‘Go big or go broke’ seems to be P. Djèlí Clark’s motto in his first novel-length foray into the world of ‘A Dead Djinn in Cairo’ and the Nebula-winning ‘The Haunting of Tram Car 015’. All feature Fatma el-Sha’arawi, an investigator at the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities in a steampunk version of Cairo. And no, you don’t have to have read the preceding novellas. Although previous events are alluded to, this is done skilfully enough to satisfy the fans but not alienate new readers. Apart from the ‘boilerplate eunuch’ automatons that serve as general dogsbodies, it is a relief that Egypt’s star is ascending while that of England, and the Empire she used to represent, is definitely on the wane. Heavens, this alternate version of Cairo even favours women’s suffrage and social equity, among other radical ideas (such as the fact that Fatma is a lesbian, and eschews the traditional policewoman’s uniform for a different suit on almost every page, it seems.) Here Fatma is teamed up with the innocent, orthodox and thoroughly out-womaned Hadia, who is nevertheless determined to get into her mentor’s good graces. Not an easy task that, especially as Fatma goes out of her way to be as inscrutable as she is unapproachable. But the reader loves her anyway. While I loved the world-building here and Clark’s clever allusions to realpolitik, the main plot unfortunately is pretty pedestrian. It starts out as a whodunnit that begins when a mysterious cult is murdered in rather outrageous fashion by the return of the master magician they supposedly venerate. It then morphs into a rote ‘save the world’ scenario when Fatma and Hadia’s (rather haphazard) pursuit of the suspected murderer unleashes more mayhem and histrionics than they had bargained for. Well, more than the entire city of Cairo had bargained for, which gets trampled underfoot by rampaging legions of warring djinn and proto gods like something out of a Jerry Bruckheimer and Michael Bay co-production. Given that the stakes are so high in the first novel, it will be interesting to see what direction Clark takes his world in next. I would have loved for a few quiet chapters where Fatma and Siti simply strolled through the sights and sounds of this utterly captivating Cairo, allowing the reader to just soak in the magic and romance of the indelible fantasy world that Clark has conjured up. Interestingly, this reminded me of ‘Network Effect’, the first full-length novel in the highly successful Murderbot series by Martha Wells, which I also found to be over-plotted. Given the lean-and-mean nature of the novella format, it seems as if both Clark and Wells let it go to their heads a bit and throw in everything, including the kitchen sink. More is sometimes not necessarily better, or even preferred. Still, if you are a fan of Clark in general and Fatma in particular, there is lots to enjoy and admire here. It is not a spoiler to reveal that, of course, she saves the world in the end. Just a pity she and her friends aren’t afforded the opportunity to enjoy it a bit more before it goes up in djinn-induced fire and brimstone.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Di Maitland

    4.75*s. A fantastic story, with a swaggering young female protagonist, set in a veritable cornucopia of middle eastern mythology. It’s longer and so very slightly slower than its predecessors, but the world building more than makes up for it. "I am the Father of Mysteries," he spoke in deeply accented English. "The Walker of the Path of Wisdom. The Traveler of Worlds. Named mystic and madman. Spoken in reverence and curse. I am the one you seek. I am al-Jahiz. And I have returned. A Master of Djin 4.75*s. A fantastic story, with a swaggering young female protagonist, set in a veritable cornucopia of middle eastern mythology. It’s longer and so very slightly slower than its predecessors, but the world building more than makes up for it. "I am the Father of Mysteries," he spoke in deeply accented English. "The Walker of the Path of Wisdom. The Traveler of Worlds. Named mystic and madman. Spoken in reverence and curse. I am the one you seek. I am al-Jahiz. And I have returned. A Master of Djinn is preceded by A Dead Djinn in Cairo (a short story) and The Haunting of Tram Car 015 (a novella) but is designed to work as a standalone. That said, I still recommend reading its predecessors first. You’ll get more from this having read those as they’re a wonderful introduction to the characters - both Fatma and Hamed - and key details referenced here are covered in more detail there. This story picks up a few months after its predecessors left off, in November 1912. On her way to investigate the mysterious immolation of a room full of people, including the English Basha, Fatma el-Sha’arawi, Special Investigator for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, finds herself joined by a new partner, Hadia Abdel Hafez, twenty-four years old, like Fatma herself, and fresh from the Academy. Together, they must get to the bottom of the incident, but their job is made a whole lot harder when their chief suspect claims to be the Prophet al-Jahiz returned. Not only does he appear to possess powers never before seen, but he begins inciting rebellion among Cairo’s poor. Soon, there’s a class war brewing and Fatma begins to suspect the very fate of Egypt is at stake. 'Playing the dandy would have to wait. Well, except for the gold tie pie and matching cuff links. Not to mention the bowler and cane. Did the violet pin-striped shirt count as dandy?' I loved Fatma’s swagger. She dresses to impress, not in delicate dresses (nor department regulation) but in smart three-piece English suits, tie to match and walking cane-cum-sword in hand. She’s confident and clever, quick with a bargain and fast to act, whether to wield a sword against impossible odds or to speak up in a crowd of dignitaries. She’s a lone wolf at heart, but does have a loyal following when she looks up long enough to notice. "Partner? Another lady Spooky Boy? Pretty like you? With a thing for suits and infidels? Should bring her by." Fatma’s pseudo-girlfriend Siti is a funny one. There’s no doubt that there’s something odd going on with her (fortunately we find out what this is), and at times she’s quite intimidatingly fierce, but the more time we spent with her, the more I liked her and, more importantly, the more I (and Fatma) trusted her. It’s hard not to like Hadia from the start. She’s more traditional than Fatma but by no means glued to her rule book. She’s eager to learn and determined to improve, but she seeks more than just her own advancement, she seeks the advancement of women everywhere. Onsi is an adorable, over-excited puppy and Hamed is definitely getting softer around the edges. I can’t wait to see more of all of them in the future. "I think the mortal wishes to do me harm. Fascinating!" Even better than the characters though, is the world-building. Djèlí Clark at last as room to play with and boy to we get the whole package. There’s djinn and jann, ifrit, Ggyptian gods, ghuls, marid, daeva, angels, golems, goblins and more. Honestly, it was amazing. What was better was that because this wasn’t a retelling, Djèlí Clark could delve into the source of some of these mythological creatures and the history of the stories in “One Thousand and One Nights”. Like the Mercy Thompson or the Kate Daniels books, the premise is that our myths and fairytales are based on true creatures and characters and these have now come to the fore once more. In some ways, this was even better for being based in a historical, non-western setting. I loved all the details around Arab culture, from dress to food and more. It felt authentic, as if written by someone who actually knew what they were talking about, rather than someone just picking and choosing the ‘exotic’ aspects of the culture for their otherwise western novel (whether that’s actually the case I don’t know, not knowing Djèlí Clark or actual Arab culture well). On the one hand, I think it would be interesting to listen to the audiobook so that I could hear the terms as they’re meant to be said (rather than in my mangled renditions), but on the other hand I was glad to be reading the book so I had time to digest the more unfamiliar aspects. Why then did I not rate it the full five stars? I’m not entirely sure, but I wasn’t desperate to do so so I didn’t. Perhaps it was because it was a little slow at times, but really we’re talking in increments not great leaps. Perhaps it was just because as a romance-fantatic I would have liked a little more swoon-worthy material and there was little to be had here. Fatma and Siti certainly have their sexy moments but I’m not gushing over their relationship and nor are they. Regardless, I will 100% be reading the next book (assuming their is one) and would recommend this highly. It’s high quality writing with a rich, unique world for all that others have written about djinn for centuries. Not to be missed. I received this book free of charge in return for an honest review. Thank you, NetGalley.

  15. 5 out of 5

    charlotte,

    On my blog. Actual rating 4.5 Rep: Egyptian cast & setting, lesbian mc, sapphic li CWs: immolation, gore, self-mutilation Galley provided by publisher Having read all of the novellas set in Fatma el-Shara’awi’s Cairo so far, hearing that there was going to be a full length book too was basically the best news in the world. I knew I was going to love it and, no surprises, I did. A Master of Djinn follows Fatma as she investigates the deaths of a secret brotherhood, dedicated to al-Jahiz, one of his On my blog. Actual rating 4.5 Rep: Egyptian cast & setting, lesbian mc, sapphic li CWs: immolation, gore, self-mutilation Galley provided by publisher Having read all of the novellas set in Fatma el-Shara’awi’s Cairo so far, hearing that there was going to be a full length book too was basically the best news in the world. I knew I was going to love it and, no surprises, I did. A Master of Djinn follows Fatma as she investigates the deaths of a secret brotherhood, dedicated to al-Jahiz, one of history’s most famous men, supposedly murdered by al-Jahiz himself, returned from the dead. His return is claimed to be in order to condemn the modern age for its oppressions, but Fatma is suspicious throughout that this individual is who he says he is, investigating with her girlfriend to bring him to justice. The best part about this book, as with the novellas, is the worldbuilding. The alternate Cairo that’s created is so vivid and real it almost jumps off the page. It’s a world that, if Clark were to write say an endless number of novellas in it, I wouldn’t be opposed in the slightest. In fact, just writing this review makes me want to go back and reread all of them so far. But really the book wouldn’t be quite as good as it is without a cast of characters you’ll love instantly. Obviously, it being part of a series, you already know Fatma and her girlfriend Siti, but you also get to meet a cast of background characters (and Fatma’s new partner, Hadia), all of whom are so fully-fleshed out, it’s like they could become main characters at any point themselves (and, actually, come to think of it, what I wouldn’t give for a novella with Hadia as the star!). This is a book, also, for all its serious topics — obviously the murders, but also colonialism and removing one’s oppressors — that made me laugh out loud at points. Fatma has that kind of personable voice, that brings you close to the action, and is also humourous when necessary. So, if you needed some sort of sign that you should read this book, you have just a week left to get yourself caught up on the series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emma☀️

    Clark has done it again, with the fantastic world-building and likable characters. Whatever he puts out, I will read it!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Hutchinson

    Excellent in every way.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    4.5 stars This is the first full length book in the series. Al-Jahiz has been accused of opening up the door between worlds before he disappeared. A cult of his followers is being murdered one by one. When someone steps forward claiming to be al-Jahiz himself and assuming guilt for the deaths, The Ministry of Alchemy, Special Enchantments and Supernatural Entitues is called onto the case. Is it even possible that al-Jahiz is still alive? Why would someone go through the trouble of impersonating h 4.5 stars This is the first full length book in the series. Al-Jahiz has been accused of opening up the door between worlds before he disappeared. A cult of his followers is being murdered one by one. When someone steps forward claiming to be al-Jahiz himself and assuming guilt for the deaths, The Ministry of Alchemy, Special Enchantments and Supernatural Entitues is called onto the case. Is it even possible that al-Jahiz is still alive? Why would someone go through the trouble of impersonating him and where are they getting their magic? I was hoping that Fatma and Agent Hamed would be paired on this latest case. Although he does make an appearance, Fatma's new partner is a bright young woman who is religiously observant. Where Fatma allows us to embrace that women can walk in whatever shoes they choose, Hadia allows us to see that there is strength in the feminine. P. Djeli Clark does a great job with giving dimension to his characters. They are flawed but grow throut the series. Dead Djinn Universe is genre defying. Part fantasy, the world building is exquisite. Very atmospheric to the point where it has a cinematic feel. Part mystery, he keeps you on the edge of your seat trying to work out the who and why. Part adventure, allo three books are action packed with killer fight scenes that have women at the forefront. And last but not least, all of P. Djeli Clark's books contain an element of social commentary that have you looking at our world both past and present.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Actual Rating: 3.5 stars (rounded up) A murder mystery set in an alternate history steampunk Cairo filled with djinn and ifrit. A dapper female investigator of cases involving supernatural entities. A rich world that blends real history with mythology and magic. Plus deconstructing colonial ideas, racism, classism, colorism....oh and a sapphic romance. It's all here in A Master of Djinn! While this wasn't a perfect book and Clark is just getting his feet wet with writing a full-length novel (his Actual Rating: 3.5 stars (rounded up) A murder mystery set in an alternate history steampunk Cairo filled with djinn and ifrit. A dapper female investigator of cases involving supernatural entities. A rich world that blends real history with mythology and magic. Plus deconstructing colonial ideas, racism, classism, colorism....oh and a sapphic romance. It's all here in A Master of Djinn! While this wasn't a perfect book and Clark is just getting his feet wet with writing a full-length novel (his shorter works are top notch), there is still a lot to love here. It's smart with interesting characters and a solid mystery, and unabashedly uses phrases from Egyptian Arabic. And having spent significant time in Cairo, I had a lot of nostalgic fun with that element. And I LOVE Fatma as a character! Her natty suits are always on point and I love her grit and determination to prove herself. Adding a hijabi partner assigned by the Ministry was also a good move and allowed for conversations about intersectional feminism, undercutting ideas that religious women who wear hijab can't also be progressive feminists and capable women. The pacing is definitely slow and the book did not need to be 400 pages long. It really drags at points and could have been trimmed to maintain the pace. And given how smart Fatma is, I thought it took rather too long for her to figure out who the villain of the story really is. It became exceedingly obvious to the reader while she was still off on another tack, and that was frustrating because it doesn't fit her character. But otherwise, I had a good time with this and will probably read whatever Clark decides to write in the future! I received an advance copy of this book for review via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

    i love women

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    This is a sly book, in that its central mystery isn't all that difficult to unravel, but you also know precisely why it isn't hard to untangle: the book is winking at you, a grin on its lips, a teasing look in its eyes. In many ways, it feels like a book interrogating what it means to be human, what defines us, how we all internalize unkind thoughts about others through the process of being alive, and how we are, each of us, responsible for acknowledging and overcoming our own biases. It is a bo This is a sly book, in that its central mystery isn't all that difficult to unravel, but you also know precisely why it isn't hard to untangle: the book is winking at you, a grin on its lips, a teasing look in its eyes. In many ways, it feels like a book interrogating what it means to be human, what defines us, how we all internalize unkind thoughts about others through the process of being alive, and how we are, each of us, responsible for acknowledging and overcoming our own biases. It is a book that doesn't bank on tragedy to create its moments of pathos. There is death and there is pain, yes. But there is no reveling in it. It is a book about fighting for tomorrow, even if there are no guarantees of such. And a book that reminds us love is a compass. Also, Fatma is a fucking style icon. I want all her suits.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    Fatma had come to learn "It's you" could mean a lot of things. It's you, the sun-dark Sa'idi from some backwater village. It's you, the woman who was all but a girl in their eyes that the Ministry had made a special investigator - and assigned to Cairo no less. It's you, the strange agent who wore Western suits. A few others tended to get less polite. Egypt boasted its modernity. Women attended schools and filled its booming factories. They were teachers and barristers. A few months back, women Fatma had come to learn "It's you" could mean a lot of things. It's you, the sun-dark Sa'idi from some backwater village. It's you, the woman who was all but a girl in their eyes that the Ministry had made a special investigator - and assigned to Cairo no less. It's you, the strange agent who wore Western suits. A few others tended to get less polite. Egypt boasted its modernity. Women attended schools and filled its booming factories. They were teachers and barristers. A few months back, women had even been granted suffrage. There was talk of entering political office. But the presence of women in public life still unnerved many. Someone like her boggled the senses completely. The first full length novel in the Dead Djinn series and I really enjoyed it! There's the odd stumbling block, not too uncommon when moving from short to long-form, but on the whole this is just such a good series. Agent Fatma is back - so are Siti, Hamed and Onsi, among others - and investigating a mass murder that carries more than one whiff of the supernatural. The Egyptian setting is phenomenal, and Clark continues to provide some absolutely gorgeous descriptive language. There's a real found-family building up between some of our characters that is absolutely my personal catnip. The investigation itself didn't feel quite as tight this time around; it frequently felt a step behind the action, which as frustrating - I like it when Fatma excels. There was a touch of the meandering feeling to the novel, too, as various new things popped up - but that one is less frustrating if it means we're building a world on a grand scale. Definitely one of the strongest steampunk novels I've read to date and a series I'm looking forward to continuing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    4.5⭐️s!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    "A Master of Djinn" sets itself apart from the bevy of monster-hunting books out there by its setting. It is set in 1912 Egypt, but a slightly twisted universe of Egypt containing robots and genies (djinn) and other fantastical creatures. It's a world backwards in time, yet also forwards. And which touches a different world entirely. It opens with a shocking gory scene beginning a murder mystery investigated by Fatma from the department that investigates spirits and ghouls and such things. Very "A Master of Djinn" sets itself apart from the bevy of monster-hunting books out there by its setting. It is set in 1912 Egypt, but a slightly twisted universe of Egypt containing robots and genies (djinn) and other fantastical creatures. It's a world backwards in time, yet also forwards. And which touches a different world entirely. It opens with a shocking gory scene beginning a murder mystery investigated by Fatma from the department that investigates spirits and ghouls and such things. Very clever and inventive.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Landice (Manic Femme)

    Ahhhh, I don’t even know where to start because it’s late and I’m tired but I absolutely adored this book!I knew from the synopsis/description alone that A Master of Djinn would be up my alley (Alternate universe steampunk fantasy Cairo with a dapper lesbian lead? Yes please!) and am pleased to report it more than lived up to my expectations! Excellent world building, well rounded characters, deft social commentary on imperialism (+ class/gender issues), and witty dialogue that had me chuckle alo Ahhhh, I don’t even know where to start because it’s late and I’m tired but I absolutely adored this book!I knew from the synopsis/description alone that A Master of Djinn would be up my alley (Alternate universe steampunk fantasy Cairo with a dapper lesbian lead? Yes please!) and am pleased to report it more than lived up to my expectations! Excellent world building, well rounded characters, deft social commentary on imperialism (+ class/gender issues), and witty dialogue that had me chuckle aloud more than once. Also, I read this as an audiobook and the narrator was as good as the story! Definitely recommend A Master of Djinn, in whatever format you prefer! Love sapphic books, too? Let's be friends! Bookstagram | Booktube | Booktok | Book Blog | Twitter

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ola G

    4/10 stars My full review is available on my blog. Let me start this review by saying I that enjoyed Clark’s short stories set in the Dead Djinn Universe quite a lot; A Dead Djinn in Cairo was snappy and entertaining, offering a refreshing mix of ideas, and The Angel of Khan el-Khalili is a solid psychological story rooted in real events, showcasing Clark’s strengths in the short form. A Master of Djinn, on the other hand… Yup, there’s no way around it: if not for NG I would have DNF’ed this book w 4/10 stars My full review is available on my blog. Let me start this review by saying I that enjoyed Clark’s short stories set in the Dead Djinn Universe quite a lot; A Dead Djinn in Cairo was snappy and entertaining, offering a refreshing mix of ideas, and The Angel of Khan el-Khalili is a solid psychological story rooted in real events, showcasing Clark’s strengths in the short form. A Master of Djinn, on the other hand… Yup, there’s no way around it: if not for NG I would have DNF’ed this book without a second’s hesitation. It was jumbled, incoherent, predictable, and boring. There are many reasons why I judge this book so harshly. First is probably the case of expectations versus reality: I really liked the short stories set in this universe and expected the novel to be more of the same, or even better. It was not to be. All the strengths of the short stories: sharp focus, snappy dialogue propelling the action forward, tantalizing glimpses of the wonders of the magic-steam-punk world imagined in detail by the author, flawed but feisty heroines, here simply disappeared in a dreadfully formulaic set of events broken by irrelevant snippets of alternate history. I will say that out loud: I don’t care about dying Ottoman Empire, beset on all sides by magically enhanced countries. I don’t care about German goblins or French fairies, or Russian rusalkas (btw, seriously? We’re matching them by the name? Then Egypt should certainly have none of djinn, being overwhelmed by a contingent of Brazilian encantados instead). The major plot points of this book, such as the peace summit, were either immaterial to the whole, or bungled so badly they seemed immaterial. Yes, I can reason out the importance of a peace summit in 1912, with all European parties increasingly more willing to spill some blood and reshuffle the cards on the table or even change the game altogether. But my understanding doesn’t come from A Master of Djinn at all – rather, from my knowledge of history. Ultimately, it seems to me that A Master of Djinn simply doesn’t know what it wants to be: a commentary on slavery and colonialism, a discussion with the Western idea of the Orient, a murder mystery (well, this one’s easy – the twist was obvious almost from the beginning, so no mystery at all), an Urban Fantasy novel a la Kate Daniels (certainly, Kate Daniels vibe was so strong at the beginning that it actually put me off this book for a while), or maybe a shot at making further use of the bunch of loose ends and conclusions from the earlier short stories – here not so much repurposed as regurgitated. It’s a book that suffers from too many disparate ideas; it would make a few good short stories, but as one novel it just disappoints. I think good murder mysteries need not only to be less predictable than this, but also need to have a solid psychological background: we need to be able to understand the motivations of the villain and to empathize with the protagonist and solve the case along them. For me, both elements were missing. To add to this injury, the key elements of the overarching plot were lifted from A Dead Djinn in Cairo. The main McGuffin, as well as the behind-the-scenes-villains, even the repetition of last-minute chases and fights were all taken from the short story and enlarged – and Clark was aware of this fact enough to include a comment about the main duo’s recurring outfits in a piece of dialogue. Well, here’s the brutal truth. “The same, but on a bigger scale” doesn’t work. It just doesn’t. [...] While I had a hard time reading and finishing this book (and boy, did I struggle: I started reading this in the first days of May, and it took me 3 weeks to finish it, which for me is like forever!) and consider it a weak book, I think other readers might be more forgiving. It’s P. Djèlí Clark’s first novel, and I can imagine that the transition from the short form to long can be difficult. It is fragmented, jumbled, and lack the punch of the short stories, but it also has cool ideas, an interesting cast of supporting characters, and a lot potential to build upon in the future. And he has great covers! I have received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark Rizk Farag

    Ladies, gentlemen, others and all in between, sit down. Today's rambling and incoherent review will be exhorting you to read Master of Djinn, written by Djeli Clark. This is Djeli Clark's full length debut following 'A Dead Djinn in Cairo', 'The Angel of khen Al Khalili' and 'The Haunting of Tram Car 015', All of which were excellent short novels set in an alternative historical , steampunky, fantastical version of Egypt. In his version of 20th century Egypt, which evidences his deep engagement w Ladies, gentlemen, others and all in between, sit down. Today's rambling and incoherent review will be exhorting you to read Master of Djinn, written by Djeli Clark. This is Djeli Clark's full length debut following 'A Dead Djinn in Cairo', 'The Angel of khen Al Khalili' and 'The Haunting of Tram Car 015', All of which were excellent short novels set in an alternative historical , steampunky, fantastical version of Egypt. In his version of 20th century Egypt, which evidences his deep engagement with the history of Egypt and its Mythology, Angels, Djinn, old Gods and a host of other mythological creatures and their magic have been brought to reality by the enigmatic Sudanese mystic Al Jahiz. This leads to the Egyptians kicking the British out and gaining influence and affluence. I was initially a little worried for Djeli, as his past books have been excellent, and I wasn't sure he would be able to outdo himself once again, but boy was I wrong. Here are some of the reasons this book is excellent and you should read it: - Djeli weaves a wildly immersive and colourful world building, based on extensive painstaking research and experience of Egypt, its culture, history, people, customs and traditions - more on this later. - the book is an example of how an author can successfully blend plot driven extrapolation, deep character development, adrenaline inducing action and slow burning mystery writing. Djeli has a lot to balance in this book and he cannot assume all his readers have read his previous short stories. Despite this, the world building is comprehensive enough to be immersive, while not detracting from the plot and his colourful and varied cast all have a chance to shine! - a truly excellent villain, who intentionally sidesteps many.... Many clichés you didn't realise existed. Djeli seems to intentionally include an exegisis of fantasy and its tropes on the text, turning them on their heads where possible. - biting social commentary. Even in creation of vivid world full of magic based on the folklore of Egyptian culture and a superb plot, Djeli still manages to make space for poignant social commentary which masterfully deals with issues such as discrimination, various forms of prejudice gender based discrimination, colonialism, bigotry and more. All as they pertain to current trends in Middle East and Egypt in particular . Djeli manages to create a magical world out of Egypt, but all the magic in the world won't wash away bigotry, hatred and ignorance. And djeli balances his love for the culture and erstwhile scholarship and respect, with his social commentary. In fact, I would go so far as to say that he does a better job of this than even the best Egyptian authors I've read (Mahfouz, Salwa Bake and Alaa Al Aswani), who attempt social commentary, but completely fail to detach from their own perspectives in any meaningful way when discussing experiences other than their own. - BADASS female characters and an ensemble of colourful, deep and quirky characters. It is essentially competence porn. All the female characters in this book are good at what they do, and do it to death. This does not stop them having flaws, being well rounded and well developed however. The main character Fatma is a suit wearing, ass kicking, crime scene investigating BADASS. Her girlfriend Siti is a femme fatale with a sharp tongue and even sharper claws. We also get Ahmed, a chain smoking crocodile headed dude who believes himself a personification of Sobek, a kickass hijabi policewoman and a super cute coptic policeman called Onsi. - An excellent ending, with a good plot twist, that a very attentive reader can tease out! Vivid and emotive fight scenes towards the end. Guaranteed to give you sanderlanche vibes. - excellent LGBTQ+ representation and good representation of black characters. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who needs a good contemporary fantasy book to blow their socks off, fans of Ancient Egyptian Mythology and to anyone like me who is.... Homesick. YOUVE REACHED THE BONUS SECTION OF THIS REVIEW! Here we discuss Djeli's erstwhile and commendably deep scholarship of Egyptian culture, which is evident throughout the book. This is genuinely very rare for western authors, who are prone to exoticising, orientalising and otherising Egypt in their writing: - when referring to neighbourhoods where things can be found, making this genuinely correspond with Cairo! For example Azbakeya as a neighbourhood for books, Muhammad Ali neighbourhood as a place for music and dancing (well..... At least back then.....) - Al Gawhara as the abode of Muhammad Ali and where he slew the Mamluke leaders - information on old Merotic (this is wildly niche) - knowledge of Ethiopian culture such as the coffee rituals, means of dressing and the battle of Adwa amongst other things. -Quranic knowledge on matters of theology and jurisprudence such as as the nature of angels -knowledge of eccentric trivialities of Egyptian society such as bawabs (essentially live in doormen?) -references to dishes such as Molokhia.... How I miss molokhia -when referencing literature - references to the greats such as Mahfouz and Taha Hussein -references to often obscure middle eastern literature such as the Tale of Princess fatima dhat Al himma - use of Egyptian Arabic sayings which are genuinely used frequently throughout the book such as 'If you steal, steal a camel and if you love, love the moon'

  28. 4 out of 5

    The Captain

    Ahoy there me mateys! I received this fantasy eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. So here be me honest musings . . . This is me sixth work by the author but not me last. This is set in the author’s early 1900s alternate Cairo where magic has returned to the world and Egypt is a major world power. First there was a short 40 page story about Agent Fatma el-Sha’arawi, then a longer novella about Senior Agent Hamed al-Nasr, and now this full-length novel set in the same world. Fatma Ahoy there me mateys! I received this fantasy eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. So here be me honest musings . . . This is me sixth work by the author but not me last. This is set in the author’s early 1900s alternate Cairo where magic has returned to the world and Egypt is a major world power. First there was a short 40 page story about Agent Fatma el-Sha’arawi, then a longer novella about Senior Agent Hamed al-Nasr, and now this full-length novel set in the same world. Fatma stars but previous characters make appearances too. A murder investigation drives the plot. The dead include a rich Englishman and his secret society dedicated to al-Jahiz. I have to admit that I knew early on who the murderer was but not how it all went down. Finding out was lots of fun. I continued to love Agent Fatma. She rocks. I also really enjoyed the addition of new agent Hadia. The djinn, in all their variations, continue to be the highlight for me. I love the steampunk feel of Cairo and the lovely twisting of the historical elements. The world building rocks and I loved more insight into the city and its denizens. The flaw of this novel was that the plot is quite scattered and Fatma doesn’t exhibit the brilliant intellect I expected of her. In addition there were just too many elements and I felt that most of them didn’t get the attention they were warranted. That said, I had fun with this and could read many more stories set in this world in whatever format the author chooses to write them in and starring lots of different folk. Arrr! Side note: I found out there is another short story set in this world. I must track it down!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    4.5 A joy to read. Review to follow.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristina (heartsfullofreads)

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars I was so excited to get a full length novel in this world! P. Djeli Clark is so talented and I'm excited to see him grow as an author. His alternate Cairo is vivid, unique, and imaginative. The Djinn and Angels are fascinating and I always want to know more about them. Did I mention Agent Fatma? I'm not sure there is another character out there quite as iconic as her. I also really appreciated the diversity and relevant social commentary in this novel. It was clever. I Actual rating: 3.5 stars I was so excited to get a full length novel in this world! P. Djeli Clark is so talented and I'm excited to see him grow as an author. His alternate Cairo is vivid, unique, and imaginative. The Djinn and Angels are fascinating and I always want to know more about them. Did I mention Agent Fatma? I'm not sure there is another character out there quite as iconic as her. I also really appreciated the diversity and relevant social commentary in this novel. It was clever. I did think the book could be a bit description heavy at times and there were a lot of info dumps. Sometimes this pulled me out of the story. It was also slightly predictable. Overall, I think A Master of Djinn is a solid novel. If you are a fantasy reader looking for something different, you should definitely pick this one up. **ARC received from publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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