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Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women

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To continue to call attention to police violence against Black women in the U.S., the African American Policy Forum, the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School, and Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow and expert on policing of women and LGBT people of color, have put forth “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women To continue to call attention to police violence against Black women in the U.S., the African American Policy Forum, the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School, and Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow and expert on policing of women and LGBT people of color, have put forth “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women.” The document is intended to serve as a resource for the media, organizers, researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders to better understand and address Black women’s experiences of profiling and policing. In addition to stories of Black women who have been killed by police and who have experienced gender-specific forms of police violence, Say Her Name provides some analytical frames for understanding their experiences and broadens dominant conceptions of who experiences state violence and what it looks like. Say Her Name responds to increasing calls for attention to police violence against Black women by offering a resource to help ensure that Black women’s stories are integrated into demands for justice, policy responses to police violence, and media representations of victims and survivors of police brutality.


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To continue to call attention to police violence against Black women in the U.S., the African American Policy Forum, the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School, and Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow and expert on policing of women and LGBT people of color, have put forth “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women To continue to call attention to police violence against Black women in the U.S., the African American Policy Forum, the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School, and Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow and expert on policing of women and LGBT people of color, have put forth “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women.” The document is intended to serve as a resource for the media, organizers, researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders to better understand and address Black women’s experiences of profiling and policing. In addition to stories of Black women who have been killed by police and who have experienced gender-specific forms of police violence, Say Her Name provides some analytical frames for understanding their experiences and broadens dominant conceptions of who experiences state violence and what it looks like. Say Her Name responds to increasing calls for attention to police violence against Black women by offering a resource to help ensure that Black women’s stories are integrated into demands for justice, policy responses to police violence, and media representations of victims and survivors of police brutality.

49 review for Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Corvus

    Short and sweet booklet putting names, faces, and stories to the often invisible black women who are victims of criminal injustice systems. The info- while nothing new to the demographic it is focused on- is quite useful for everyone else. Unapologetic defenses of people without respectability politics or cherry picking perfect victims. It is available for free on aapf.org. Recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    I wasn't expecting a term paper when I checked this out from the library, but that's essentially how it reads. That or a research paper published in an academic journal. So while it sounds very templated, it contains a lot of information and some strong arguments for increasing standards for police officer behavior in the United States. Full of anecdotes and many, many names, this book lays out the argument that Black women are treated humanely by law enforcement even less often than their male c I wasn't expecting a term paper when I checked this out from the library, but that's essentially how it reads. That or a research paper published in an academic journal. So while it sounds very templated, it contains a lot of information and some strong arguments for increasing standards for police officer behavior in the United States. Full of anecdotes and many, many names, this book lays out the argument that Black women are treated humanely by law enforcement even less often than their male counterparts. We often hear in the news about police brutality against Black men, but Black women are many times more likely to suffer--for a variety of reasons--at the hands of those who stand blameless behind the badge. Complete with photos, dates, and locations, this is a quick read that gives a straight-forward account of many moments in recent history, concluding with questions for discussion when used in a group setting. It's not as deep or thoughtful as a full book, but it's a good start toward understanding this particular perspective on a crucial situation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Brinkley

  4. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Jonah

  5. 5 out of 5

    Walker

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Lynch

  7. 5 out of 5

    Raven

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alix

  9. 4 out of 5

    Genesee Rickel

    I read the chapters "Say Her Name" and "Gender and Sexuality Policing" for a book club. This is a short but intense read. I plan on reading it cover to cover (hence to rating right now). I read the chapters "Say Her Name" and "Gender and Sexuality Policing" for a book club. This is a short but intense read. I plan on reading it cover to cover (hence to rating right now).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shawna Garcia

  12. 5 out of 5

    Austin Thierry

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gerald J Presley

  14. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  16. 4 out of 5

    anjeee

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sonia Allison

  18. 5 out of 5

    Candy Apple

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Garcia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Page

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Mouser (she/her)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cullyn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vince

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  29. 5 out of 5

    KbW

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana Machado-Griffin

  31. 4 out of 5

    Rose Rodriguez

  32. 5 out of 5

    Quis

  33. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Barnett

  34. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  35. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Goins

  36. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  37. 4 out of 5

    Kay

  38. 4 out of 5

    Quyen S

  39. 5 out of 5

    Shontay Richardson

  40. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  41. 5 out of 5

    Prasanna

  42. 5 out of 5

    John Schlotfelt

  43. 4 out of 5

    Piper Mount

  44. 4 out of 5

    Trieste

  45. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

  46. 4 out of 5

    Felix

  47. 5 out of 5

    Julia Jackson

  48. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

  49. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

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